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you couldn't carry a gun around in the town like dodge city is a good example. there were walls against that. if you are a cowboy that came in when you were supposed to go story or pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way that most people think about it. >> guest: this is of course settlements out in the wild prairie, but they are like towns everywhere today. you need to call and order in the towns and it's hard to keep that up. >> host: even the shootout at the corral was a starting point. >> guest: clams and i think it was had been arrested or accused of violating below will ordinance and forbade carrying a local firearm. incidentally the understanding of what gun rights were for beginning to evolve in the 19th century, and in particular in the south in the early 19th century it was a big problem with duals the most famous one is aaron burr and hamilton, but this was fairly common but it was frowned upon and it can be prosecuted and he had to keep moving around to avoid being prosecuted, so but one of the names of people who insisted on the spot started to
or -- >> guest: dodge city is a good example. there were laws against that. you had to deposit your arms. if you were a cowboy who came in from the plains there was place where you were supposed to store your pistol if you had one. >> host: that didn't fit with the way most people think about it. >> guest: this is in settlements. knotted out in the wild prairie. but they're like towns everywhere today. you need a little law and order in towns and it's hard to keep that up if erv is pull ought a pistol. >> host: even the shootout at the okay corral was gun control. >> guest: it started because of ike had been arrested or accused of violating the local ordinance that forbids carrying a firearm openly around town. >> host: incidentally, the understanding of what gun rights were for began to evolve in the 19th century in particular in the south. in the earl 19th century there was a big problem with duels. duels between gentlemen, obviously the most famous one is aaron burr and alexander hamilton. but this is dueling was fairly common, about it was frowned upon, and could be prosecuted, and had to ke
in a town like dodge city is a good example. there were laws against that. you had to depart with your arms. if you with a cowboy coming in from the plains, there was a place to store your pistol if you had one. >> host: that doesn't fit with the way people think about it. >> guest: no. this is, of course, in settlements, not in the wild prairie, but, you know, they were like towns everywhere today. you need a little law and order in town, and that's hard to keep up with everyone has a pistol. >> host: a shootout at okay corral. >> guest: it started because they had a firearm carried around town, and incidentally, the understanding of what gun rights were for start in the 19th century and particularly, in the south. in the early 19th century, there was a big problem with duals between gentlemen, obviously, the most famous is aaron burr and alexander hamilton, but dueling was popular, but frowned upon and could be prosecuted. burr had to move around to avoid being prosecuted. >> host: vice president burr actually. >> guest: was a vice president. but one of the means that people who insisted
a political battle we fought out but it's an urban area or city in the frontier trying to get its act together? >> guest: oddly, courts didn't have much to say except in state courts were for the most part are we going baystate and lower federal courts supported the right and saw it as not a rate that belonged to criminals are to be used for criminal purposes, but more as a write-in connection to civic duty. but the supreme court didn't say anything about the second amendment for about a century. they mentioned it briefly in a ruling in 1876 and that was u.s. versus cruickshank, which rose out of the horrible massacre, one of the worst in the reconstruction. , with the whole war, blacks had tried to defend themselves in louisiana and were attacked by white crowds and the federal government attempted to prosecute the attackers on the grounds that they had deprived the blacks who were killed -- >> host: mna type issue. >> guest: didn't find that was the case. at that time we don't see any racial motivation at all to deprive blacks of their very specifically. in a kind of a side, the ruling said
, for in new york city for example where there are 5000 of them. do you ever hear about how they interact with students and are there ever problems and with school safety officers actually serving as bullies themselves? >> guest: i am sure there are instances. you know, there are instances where teachers are found to be bullying students. i think absolutely those things happen and i think we don't want to have officers in our schools schools -- we want officers in our schools in a situation where they are needed to keep kids safe or to provide some kind of helpful direction that helps them resolve things before they get to a point where they are 18 years old and they have a record that can really damage them for life. >> host: how do you inoculate the officers and the teachers for that matter against being part of the problem? what is important for them by way of training to ensure that they have the tools and also that they are accountable for protecting the kids and helping them? >> guest: i think it's the same thing, comes down to what happens in the building where all of the adults ta
of new york city when he was teaching he would identify kids who were at risk and bring them into his classroom and ask his class to support them and work with them. it seemed like a kind of common sense but a brilliant approach to make everybody part of the solution. >> guest: absolutely. one of the things we see often with kids who have special needs or have a learning disability or autism so often the philosophy is to help give them tools to not be targeted or to make them less likely to be targeted. >> host: like avoiding a different situations? >> guest: different areas of school but we know kids are vulnerable and and there is little supervision but i think that is only one piece of the puzzle. >> host: it's a little bit of a cop-out, right? >> guest: if the had the disabilities that made them more likely to be bullied is the social disability, so i think that one of the things we have to do a better job of, and i think that the essay speaks to this is how do you educate the entire community about disability like autism or learning disabilities so that it's not up to the person
where you have police officers stationed in the school, i mean, in new york city, for example, there are 5,000 of them -- >> guest: right. >> host: do you ever hear about, um, how they interact with students? and are there ever problems with school safety officers actually being sort of bullies themselves? >> guest: i'm sure there are instances, you know, there are instances where teachers are, um, found to be bullying and harassing their students. >> host: uh-huh. >> guest: i think that, absolutely, those things happen. and i think that we don't want to have officers in our schools to intimidate kids. .. >> i think it's the same thing that comes down to what happens in a building where all of the adult teak is seriously and it's about culture. it's not about were not going to do the site behaviors because those are holy. it's a connect the overall picture of the culture and climate in the school and one of the things is that strong leadership really start to talk that principle have a great deal of influence over how all of the adults in their building treat not only the kids
is jefferson sent missionary to france to buy the louisiana territory. he didn't he sent them to buy the city of new orleans from fraps. the louisiana territory as a whole was not mentioned by anyone in the united states as even a possibility. so they traveled across the atlantic and lands in france and starts traveling toward paris. and before he arrives in paris, the american ambassador who was already there robert living stone approached who is that poll yon's foreign minister and said how would you like to boy the interterritory of louisiana. it's not vising living stone said yes. let's do it. they negotiate and they arrive and they complete the negotiations. they are -- james monroe. who would become marylandson's secretary of state and would then become's madison's suck receiver as president. we have a bunch of people who would be president almost president, evaluated. mob row and living stone complete the negotiation. they are not difficult. the french want to sell. they bigger problems with the britain. >> host: they want the cash. in louisiana they decided is a write off. >> that pol
it by jet to another city, have it treated at another facility in another city or state, have it flown back and then cut the patient open up again for second operation. why would anyone have that done? they just don't know about the other option. i'm not talking about hospitals. i'm talking about to the top 10 hospitals in the country do this. we have got smart people, good people working in a bad system where the financial incentives lure people to do things that just aren't right. i think if hospitals are accountable for their results the results and the patient satisfaction is scored in the patient outcomes and the complication rate, the volumes in the readmission rates, all the basic metrics in health care performance that doctors are endorsing as valid, they were available to the public, people could choose where to go based on who performs the best like any other free market works and like any other uses to reduce waste in their field. >> host: so the issue of patient choice about where they seek care and what has been out there and certainly the health care literature and discussions
to be confident and hopeful, and i was impressed by the story in the book about the president in new york city of a school who identify kids who were at risk and he brought them into his classroom and he asked his class to support them. to work with them. it seemed like a commonsense but brilliant approach to making everybody part of the solution. >> guest: absolutely. one of the things we see with kids that have special needs or learning disabilities or autism, so often we need to help give those kits tools to not be targeted or to make them less likely to be targeted. i think avoiding certain situations can help. >> host: we know that kids are vulnerable. >> guest: these kids have the social skills, so many individuals, it is social disability to be in that situation. to be a bully. i think that it comes down to how you educate the entire community about disabilities like autism so that it's not up to the person who is struggling to keep up or who is struggling in this social the social hierarchy, to make sure that everyone else knows that this is what autism looks like. this is why autism -
to put it in the cooler and ascended by jet to another city and have it treated at another facility and other city or state had it flown back and then cut the patient open again for a second operation why would anyone have the procedure done? they just don't know what the other option how do they do this we have smart people, good people working in a bad system on the financial incentives i think if hospitals are accountable for the results, the satisfaction scores, the patient outcomes, the complication rates, the volumes that we have the mission rates come all the basic missions of telstra performance that doctors are endorsing by. if they are available to the public people could choose where to go based on who performs the best like any other free-market works and like any other free-market uses to reduce waste in their field. >> host: the issue about patient choice where they seek care, certainly the health care literature and discussion among for a number of years where many people love to kate that if indeed patients have the opportunity to see the quality to see individual po
but because they don't have a laboratory, put it into a cooler, send it by jet to another city, have it treat at another facility in another city or state, have it flown back and then cut the patient open up again for a second operation. why would anyone have that procedure done? they don't know about the other options. now, i'm not talking about tiny hospitals. i'm talking about two of the u.s. news and world report top ten hospitals in the country do this? we've got smart people, good people, working in a bad system where these financial incentives lure people to do things that just aren't right. and i think if hospitals are accountable for their results, if the patient satisfaction scores, the patient outcomes, the complication rates, the volumes, the readmission rates, all the basic metrics are health care performance that doors are endorsing as valid. if they were available to the public, people could choose where to go based on who performs the best like any other free market, and like any other free market uses to reduce waste in their field. >> host: so, the issue of patient choice, a
't have the laboratory, put it in the cooler and send it to another city, how they treated at another facility in another city or state. how the phone back and cut the patient open again for a second operation. why would anyone have that procedure done? they don't know about the other option. i'm not talking tiny hospitals. i'm talking to a news world report and the countries do this. we've got smart people, good people working in a bad system, where financial incentives lure people to do things that just aren't ready. if hospitals are accountable for the results, if the patient satisfaction scores, outcomes, complication rates, volumes i readmission rates, on the basic metrics of health care reform and the doctors and nurses that would, if they were available to the public, people could choose where to go based on who performs the best like any other free-market works unlike any other free-market uses in their field. >> host: the issue of patient choice about where they seek care is one that's been out there and certainly in literature and discussions amongst leaders for a number of
totally carry this, my sons would carry this. >>guest: my son is a lawyer in new york city he does not check luggage. he was like i want the black. i was like ok. you are not getting it yet. >>host: it is very classy. my son is a huge international traveler, same thing. and they are picky. they want to look nice.if you are shopping for your son or grandson or a son-in-3 they traveled little bit, this is an incredible gift. >>guest: or the husband or men in your life. >>host: for us, you can see how classy this looks. >>guest: the black is pretty. >>host: it is hard to pick. >>guest: i want to open up the browned. this becomes your trunk. -- you could take the drawers out and lay it down like itor regular suitcase. i have boots slippers. you can fit so much,2500 cubic inches of storage capacity. then you zip it up so you never need to pack or unpack when you go anywhere. you get the shoulder strap for the barrel-tote. luggage cuff. it snaps on the handle and even on your if you want to. then you get the hanging toiletry bag we put a carry-on luggage. and you get the luggag
national, the destruction of slavery in the united states 1861-1855, james oakes, history professor at city university of new york argues that slavery was the foremost reason for the civil war. walter bender, charles cain, jody corners, and neil donahue who all contributed to creating the company one laptop per child was that a company history and provided an outline for other social of japan yours in learning to change the world, the social impact of one lap top per child. in napoleon, left a legacy, and
city, the center of the world and my father was republican and a conservative. he served in world war ii as eisenhower said the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which it grew and anything we did was in the shadow of that. so i was curious about it and the bomb story really does have another origin. the book about the scientist of the 30s and above all the mentioned this figure about henry wallace and how he could've been president in 1944 but he was bumped by the political bosses. that led of course to the 45 decision by truman. then we begin the origin of a great idea for a documentary or a movie and he wrote a script. it didn't work for me, but 10 years later it haunted me that story in washington and he is still teaching a class when i came back. we decided to go ahead and do it.mandari about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned into ultimately -- our eyes are bigger than our stomachs and we tried a 12 hour national security state story from the 1940s to now and it actually started in 1900 with the philippine american war but the spanish-american war and then in 2012
, and it controlled new york city, and the center of the world, and my father was a republican and conservative, and he served in world war ii with eisenhower. so the bomb was the umbrella, the mushroom under which i grew, and everything we did was in the shadow of that. so, i was curious about it. the bomb story does have another origin. the 1930s, had written a book about the scientist. but above all he mentioned this figure about henry wallace, and how he could have been president in 1944 but he was bumped by the political bosses. and that led, of course, to the '45 decision by truman and became the origin for a great documentary or movie, and at the tried. wrote a script. didn't work. but ten years later, that -- still teaching the class, and he -- we decided to go ahead and do a documentary about wallace and the bump. that one hour turned ultimately into a bigger -- our eyes were bigger than our stomachs and we tried for a 12-hour national security state story, from 1940s until now. actually we started in 1900, the philippine-american war. but -- spanish american war and ended up in 2012.
Search Results 0 to 16 of about 17